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Slamdance and Chill | Vol. 2

Volume 2 of a series of Slamdance films you can stream at home! Support Slamdance filmmakers and learn, laugh, and be entertained at the same time. Feature films are available for rent, purchase or, in some cases, through streaming services you already subscribe to. All short films are free to watch online. We've created some suggested pairings to help guide you through but feel free to create your own viewing adventure. Enjoy! My Name is Myeisha (2018) Directed by Gus Krieger, Written by Rickerby Hinds, Gus Krieger Inspired by the 1998 police shooting of California teen Tyisha Miller and adapted from the internationally acclaimed play, Dreamscape. At the moment of Myeisha's death at the hands of police, she guides us inside her mind and muses over the life she will be leaving behind, told through hip-hop, spoken word poetry, and dance. Watch on: Youtube | Amazon | Google Play | iTunes   See it with the short film... Get Out Fast (2017) Written & Directed by Haley Elizabeth Anderson Alex's best friend, Coyote Boy, is missing and he doesn't know why. Watch on Vimeo     Beats (2019) Directed by Brian Welsh, Written by Kieran Hurley, Brian Welsh During a pro basketball lockout, a sports agent pitches a rookie basketball client on an intriguing and controversial...

Slamdance and Chill

A weekly-updated list of Slamdance films you can stream at home! Support Slamdance filmmakers and learn, laugh, and be entertained at the same time. Feature films are available for rent, purchase or, in some cases, through streaming services you already subscribe to. All short films are free to watch online. We've created some suggested pairings to help guide you through but feel free to create your own viewing adventure. Enjoy! Lost Holiday (2019) Written and Directed by Michael Kerry Matthews & Thomas Matthews After Margaret meets her ex-boyfriend's fiancé, she goes on an adventure with Henry and Sam, her least mature friends. What starts as a search for LSD quickly puts them at the center of an heiress's disappearance that she is determined to solve. Watch on: Youtube | Amazon | Google Play | Vudu Pairs well with the short film Get Up Pierrot(2019) Directed by Gurleen Rai, F. Anthony Shepherd An existential pastry made by folding layers of identity upon itself with equal parts tears and smiles. Watch on Vimeo   High Flying Bird (2019) Directed by Steven Soderbergh, Written by Tarell Alvin McCraney During a pro basketball lockout, a sports agent pitches a rookie basketball client on an intriguing and controversial business proposition. Watch on Netflix Watch it with... Q (2017) Directed by...

An Important Update on Emergence LA and Slamdance Miami

Dear Slamdance Community, It is with great sadness that we announce the postponement of Slamdance’s LA Emergence event (March 26-29) and the cancellation of Slamdance Miami (May 28-31). Given the rapidly changing situation regarding the spread of COVID-19, and recommendations from State and Local government officials against large public gatherings, we feel this is the best decision for the health and safety of our filmmakers and our communities in Los Angeles and Miami. Ticket holders for any Emergence screenings can obtain a full refund for their reservations through ArcLight Cinemas. You can find instructions here on how to cancel your tickets. Pass holders can contact us directly at submissionsslamdance.com for refunds. Emergence LA will be held at a later date this year, so if you’d like to wait on canceling your pass, it will automatically be valid for the new dates. We will continue to monitor the situation closely with the ArcLight in the coming weeks and months as we look towards future dates for Emergence. Submitters to Slamdance Miami will receive a refund of their submission fees in the next few weeks. We appreciate your patience and understanding in the time it will take to do this. Slamdance has always been first and foremost about community. We have navigated through the terrain of independent...

Announcing Emergence: Los Angeles March 26-29

February 26, 2020 (Los Angeles, CA) - ArcLight Cinemas and Slamdance today announced the lineup for their inaugural Emergence Film Festival, taking place March 26th - 29th at ArcLight Cinemas’ Hollywood location. The lineup includes both premieres and Slamdance Park City festival favorites and will showcase Features, Shorts, and Episodics along with Slamdance’s signature categories Anarchy and DIG. This new partnership is an extension of the two organizations’ successful Slamdance Cinema Club screening series. Tickets and passes are now on sale. Tickets can be purchased online and at the theater. Passes can be purchased in advance through the Slamdance website here. The lineup is comprised overwhelmingly of local filmmakers, with a Los Angeles connection for 90% of the features, further supporting the local independent film community. There will be eight features with a mix between documentaries and narratives, nineteen shorts and episodes, 11 Anarchy shorts and four DIG experiences. All feature films are directorial debuts with budgets of less than $1 million USD and without US distribution. Films were selected by a team of Slamdance alumni and are programmed democratically. Feature Films and Shorts will be eligible for an audience award and ArcLight Cinemas will award the Shorts winner with distribution across its chain. Photos of selected films available here. “With the launch of Emergence,...

The Cinema That Refused to Close

By Noel Lawrence Last month, I flew to Rotterdam to premiere my new film Sammy-Gate​ ​at their storied and sprawling film festival. Much as I enjoyed my stay in the glorious lair of the IFFR Tiger, a filmmaker should never forget where he or she came from. And for the better part of 20 years, that place has been in the bowels of the underground: screening in squats, sleeping on couches, and struggling to achieve one’s cinematic visions in an economy of scarcity. As a filmworker in Hollywood, I forget my roots at times. I make no pretense of bohemian sainthood. But I am nonetheless delighted to see young people taking up the arms that I have laid down. And that brings me to the story of ​La Clef​, a small cinema in the Latin Quarter of Paris. During the festival, a small delegation of theatre volunteers blanketed Rotterdam with pamphlets about their cause. Without going into detail, the owners of the building that housed the cinema planned to sell it. And, more likely than not, the theatre would be replaced by a supermarket or a bank. If this happened somewhere in America, the closure probably would provoke a brief flurry of angry and sad emoji on Facebook. And, after that flurry, the cinema would...

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